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Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Giving and Receiving Gratitude


I received this from a friend this week... no more is needed...

Subject: Giving and receiving Gratitude


...The Whale... If you read a recent front page story of the San Francisco Chronicle,
You would have read about a female humpback whale who had become entangled in a spider web of crab traps and lines.
She was weighted down by hundreds of pounds of traps that caused her to struggle to stay afloat.
She also had hundreds of yards of line rope wrapped around her body, her tail, her torso, a line tugging in her mouth.
A fisherman spotted her just east of the Farallon Islands (outside the Golden Gate ) and radioed an environmental group for help.
Within a few hours, the rescue team arrived and determined that she was so bad off, the only way to save her was to dive in and untangle her.
They worked for hours with curved knives and eventually freed her. When she was free, the divers say she swam in what seemed like joyous circles.
She then came back to each and every diver, one at a time, and nudged them, pushed them gently around as she was thanking them.
Some said it was the most incredibly beautiful experience of their lives.
The guy who cut the rope out of her mouth said her eyes were following him the whole time, and he will never be the same.
May you, and all those you love, be so blessed and fortunate to be surrounded by people who will help you get untangled from thethings that are binding you. And, may you always know the joy of giving and receiving gratitude. I pass this on to you, my friends, in the same spirit.



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Saturday, November 27, 2010

Cancer Rates and the Economics of Cancer in Canada... by province

So why is it that the federal government in Canada don't seem to think that cancer is a big problem in Canada...

Could it be partly associated with the incidence rates of cancer by province, and in specific provinces compared to the average in the country. Lower population provinces in particular might want to be tracking the question... the rates in the low population areas, especially in the east, are much higher than in the rest of the country.

The data below are from the Canadian Cancer Society website... numbers have been taken from population and from incident and mortality rates, by province.

Province Population..# of New Cases 2010..% of pop..# of deaths..% of pop

BC.....4,530,960............21,600..............0.48%.......9,500............0.2%

AL.....3,720,946............15,900..............0.43%.......6,200...........0.16%

SK.....1,045,622.............5,200...............0.49%......2,400............0.23%

MN....1,235,412.............6,200...............0.50%......2,800............0.23%

ON...13,210,677...........65,100...............0.49%......28,200...........0.21%

QC.....7,907,373...........45,200...............0.57%......20,300...........0.26%

NB........751,755............4,600...............0.61%........2,020...........0.27%

NF........509,739............2,700...............0.53%........1,420...........0.28%

NS....... 942,506............6,200...............0.67%........2,750...........0.29%

Total 34,108,752.........173,800................0.51%......76,200...........0.22%

Basically we can recognize here that the rate of cancer as a percentage of population increases as you go from West to East. As a matter of fact, the incidence and death rates in Nova Scotia are about 50% higher in Nova Scotia than in Alberta or British Columbia. One might posit that the aging of population has something to do with it... but the rate in Ontario and Quebec are also significantly lower...

Some things come to mind as questions... are the environmental factors so much worse in the east than the west? Is there a need for more financial support of the health system in the east as a result? Do prevailing winds really carry the air pollution to the east through the Jet or other stream to the degree that the cancer rates are impacted by what the folks are doing in Alberta... more than we want to believe. I don't know the questions to ask... but I know we should be wondering, in Nova Scotia, why we keep being dumped on...

On another note... I listened to an article on palliative care, for all types of patients, recently. The statistic was that 90% of all people alive today in Canada will need the support of Palliative Care (or reasonable facsimile) when they are about to die... and it will not be available to 70% of those needing it... this because we are not setting up for the costs, and infrastructure it will require. When are we planning to start doing something about these types of statistics.

It becomes clear to me that in Canada and the USofA we are not willing to do the hard things now, so that the future will be better not only for the aging, but also for the young of today, who will bear the brunt of the costs for the future.

It seems to me that the "boomers" are not willing to confront the issues through the normal channels... the people we elect as members of parliament and the legislatures of the country... and in America the same with congress and the state governments. We can not continue to abuse the future to maintain the material present. It is time to do something about it.

I believe we should consider electing independent members of the various legislative bodies, who will work from the inside to ensure that we start working quickly toward a better health and death system. And if we can not get things changed, at least here in Canada from within the government... we should expect that revolution will occur within the boomer's live time.

Here are some other data points... taken from various web sites including the Canadian Cancer Society and the Government of Canada

Economics of Cancer

Apart from the devastating effects on patients and their families, cancer causes a huge financial burden for individuals and society.

  • Cancer costs Canadians more than $14 billion every year
  • Cancer associated healthcare costs are expected to surpass $176 billion over the next 30 years
  • Federal and provincial governments combined are expected to lose over $248 billion in tax revenues as a result of cancer disability over the next 30 years.
  • More than $100 billion dollars will be lost in wage based productivity due to cancer in the next 30 years

This huge economic impact to Canadians can be split into direct and indirect costs. Direct costs include care provided in hospitals and other institutions, physician services, drugs and other (including other health professionals, capital expenditures, public health and research). Indirect costs include estimates of the value of life lost due to premature death (mortality costs) and the value of activity days lost due to disability (morbidity costs). The data presented in the following paragraphs may be found in the report Economic Burden of Illness in Canada (Health Canada, 2002).

Cancer accounted for $2.5 billion in direct costs, hospital care costing $1.8 billion and representing 74% of this amount. Of the hospital care costs, 53% was expended for those 65 years and older, although this group accounts for 58% of cancer patients. In contrast, children with cancer accounted for 2.5% of hospital costs but made up less than 1% of the cancer population.

Physician services to treat cancer cost $333 million, or 14% of the direct costs of cancer. Approximately $210 million, or 9% of direct cancer costs, were spent on drugs for cancer treatment. Seventeen percent and 12% of the total drug costs spent on cancer treatment were accounted for by breast and prostate cancer respectively. Cancer research funding, at a cost of $80 million, represents only 3% of the direct costs of cancer but 19% of the total funding for medical research in Canada that could be attributed to a specific type of disease.

The estimated direct costs of cancer are conservative, since almost one-half of the total direct cost of illness in Canada could not be attributed to specific diseases. It is equally unclear whether all cancer prevention and screening activities undertaken by governments and by non-government organizations were identified.

Cancer accounted for $11.8 billion in indirect costs. Cancer accounted for almost one-third of premature mortality costs (32%), reflecting the fact that cancer is the leading cause of premature mortality in Canada. Eight percent of the costs of premature mortality due to all diseases was accounted for by lung cancer alone (or 26% of the total due to cancer). Long-term disability costs attributable to cancer ($962 million) accounted for only 3% of the total long-term disability costs of all illnesses/injuries. Short-term disability costs for cancer were estimated at $174 million, or 2% of the total short-term disability costs.

Cost Benefits of Earlier Detection

Currently, only 19-65% of the most common cancers discussed are detected while the tumours are still in the early, most treatable stages. It has been estimated that, if all tumours were detected before spreading beyond the organ of origin, 5-year survival rates would increase as shown in Figure 1*. A corresponding decline in the economic burden of cancer could be expected. Included in the figure are the current estimates of the direct costs of cancer, for Canadians in $ billions.

* Figure modified from tabulated information in Etzioni R, Urban N, Ramsey S, McIntosh M, Schwartz S, Reid B, et al. The case for early detection. Nat Rev Cancer 2003; 3: 243-252.

General cancer statistics for 2010

An estimated 173,800 new cases of cancer (excluding about 75,500 non-melanoma skin cancers) and 76,200 deaths will occur in Canada in 2010.

· Approximately 83,900 Canadian women will be diagnosed with cancer and an estimated 36,200 women will die of cancer.

· Approximately 90,000 Canadian men will be diagnosed with cancer and an estimated 40,000 men will die of cancer.

· On average, 3,340 Canadians will be diagnosed with cancer every week.

· On average, 1,470 Canadians will die of cancer every week.

The risk of cancer increases with age: 43% of new cancer cases and 61% of cancer deaths will occur among those who are at least 70 years old. However, cancer can occur at all ages.

· Lung, prostate, breast and colorectal cancer account for 50% of all new cancer cases every year.

· Lung cancer accounts for over a quarter (27%) of all cancer deaths each year.

· Breast cancer accounts for over a quarter (28%) of new cancer cases in women.

· Prostate cancer accounts for over a quarter (27%) of new cancer cases in men.

Probability of developing or dying from cancer

Based on 2009 incidence rates, 40% of Canadian women and 45% of men will develop cancer during their lifetimes.

An estimated 1 out of every 4 Canadians are expected to die from cancer.

Cancer is the leading cause of premature death in Canada: 1,026,600 years of life were lost in 2004 as a result of cancer. This represents 32% of the potential years of life lost resulting from all causes of death.

Prevalence

At the beginning of the year 2005, there were approximately 723,000 cases of cancer that had been diagnosed in the previous 10 years.

Survival

Based on 2002-2004 estimates, 62% of people are expected to survive for 5 years after their cancer diagnosis compared to the general population of the same age and sex. Survival rates differ according to the type of cancer.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Canadian women (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer).

In 2010:

  • An estimated 23,200 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and 5,300 will die of it.
  • An estimated 180 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer and 50 will die of it.
  • On average, 445 Canadian women will be diagnosed with breast cancer every week.
  • On average, 100 Canadian women will die of breast cancer every week.

Probability of developing or dying from breast cancer

One in 9 women is expected to develop breast cancer during her lifetime and one in 28 will die of it.

Trends in breast cancer

Breast cancer incidence rose steadily from 1980 to the early 1990s, partly because of increased mammography screening. Breast cancer death rates have declined in every age group since at least the mid 1980s.

Last modified on: 19 May 2010

Colorectal cancer statistics

Year: 2010

Males

Females

Cases

12,400

10,100

Incidence rate*

62

41

Incidence rank

3rd

3rd

Deaths

5,000

4,100

Death rate*

25

16

5-year survival (2002-2004)

61%

62%

*age-standardized to the 1991 Canadian Standard Population (per 100,000)

In 2010, an estimated 22,500 Canadians will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer and 9,100 will die of it. Overall, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in men and women combined.

  • An estimated 10,100 women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer and 4,100 will die of it.
  • An estimated 12,400 men will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer and 5,000 will die of it.
  • On average, 430 Canadians will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer every week.
  • On average, 175 Canadians will die of colorectal cancer every week.

Probability of developing or dying from colorectal cancer

  • One in 14 men is expected to develop colorectal cancer during his lifetime and one in 27 will die of it.
  • One in 15 women is expected to develop colorectal cancer during her lifetime and one in 31 will die of it.

Trends in colorectal cancer

In both sexes, incidence rose between 1980 and 1985, then declined to the mid-1990s (more strongly in females than in males). Rates then rose through 2000 only to decline significantly thereafter (more strongly in males than in females). Death rates have been declining in both sexes.

Last modified on: 19 May 2010

Lung cancer statistics

Year: 2010

Males

Females

Cases

12,900

11,200

Incidence rate*

66

48

Incidence rank

2nd

2nd

Deaths

11,200

9,400

Death rate*

57

39

5-year survival (2002-2004)

13%

17%

*age-standardized to the 1991 Canadian Standard Population (per 100,000)

In 2010, an estimated 24,200 Canadians will be diagnosed with lung cancer and 20,600 will die of it. Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death for both men and women.

  • An estimated 11,200 women will be diagnosed with lung cancer and 9,400 will die of it.
  • An estimated 12,900 men will be diagnosed with lung cancer and 11,200 will die of it.
  • On average, 465 Canadians will be diagnosed with lung cancer every week.
  • On average, 395 Canadians will die of lung cancer every week.

Probability of developing or dying from lung cancer

One in 11 men is expected to develop lung cancer during his lifetime and one in 13 will die of it. One in 16 women is expected to develop lung cancer during her lifetime and one in 18 is expected to die of it.

Trends in lung cancer

While still elevated, the incidence rate seems to be leveling off in women. In men, the incidence has been decreasing. Lung cancer death rates continue to climb among women while decreasing among men.

Last modified on: 19 May 2010

Prostate cancer statistics

Year: 2010

Males

Cases

24,600

Incidence rate*

123

Incidence rank

1st

Deaths

4,300

Death rate*

22

5-year survival (2002-2004)

95%

*age-standardized to the 1991 Canadian Standard Population (per 100,000)

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among Canadian men (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer). In 2010:

  • An estimated 24,600 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 4,300 will die of it.
  • On average, 470 Canadian men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer every week.
  • On average, 80 Canadian men will die of prostate cancer every week.

Probability of developing or dying from prostate cancer

One in 7 men will develop prostate cancer during his lifetime (the risk is highest after age 60) and one in 27 will die of it.

Trends in prostate cancer

There has been an overall upward trend in the incidence rate of prostate cancer since 1980, which is likely due to increased early detection or possible changes in risk factors. Death rates rose much more slowly during the same period and started to decline in the mid 1990s.

Last modified on: 19 May 2010

Nova Scotia statistics

Overview

In 2010, an estimated 2,750 people will die of cancer in Nova Scotia, and 6,200 new cases will be diagnosed.

Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in Nova Scotia, with an estimated 1,050 men to be diagnosed in 2010.

Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death in Nova Scotia. An estimated 970 people (450 men; 310 women) will die of lung cancer in 2010.

For the first time, the 2010 Canadian Cancer Statistics report estimates there will be fewer cases of lung cancer diagnosed in Nova Scotia women, compared to previous years. This change reflects the continuing decline in smoking among women that started in the mid-1980s. This pattern has already been observed in men, as their rate of tobacco use began to decline earlier than it did for women.

Cancer statistics for Nova Scotia men

For Nova Scotia men, prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer, followed by colorectal cancer and lung cancer, respectively.

In 2010:

  • An estimated 1050 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer.
  • An estimated 460 men will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer.
  • An estimated 510 men will be diagnosed with lung cancer.

For Nova Scotia men, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, followed by colorectal cancer and prostate cancer, respectively.

In 2010:

  • An estimated 450 men will die of lung cancer.
  • An estimated 190 men will die of colorectal cancer.
  • An estimated 140 men will die of prostate cancer.

Cancer statistics for Nova Scotia women

For Nova Scotia women, breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer, followed by both lung cancer and colorectal cancer.

In 2010:

  • An estimated 740 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer.
  • An estimated 460 women will be diagnosed with lung cancer.
  • An estimated 400 women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

For Nova Scotia, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, followed by breast cancer and colorectal cancer, respectively.

In 2010:

  • An estimated 310 women will die of lung cancer.
  • An estimated 180 women will die of breast cancer.
  • An estimated 160 women will die of colorectal cancer.

The above findings are taken from the 2010 Canadian Cancer Statistics. These statistics are prepared, printed, and distributed through a collaboration of the Canadian Cancer Society, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Statistics Canada, provincial/territorial cancer registries, as well as university-based and provincial/territorial cancer agency-based cancer researchers.

Last modified on: 07 August 2010

Cancer statistics in New Brunswick

Overview of new cases and deaths

An estimated 173,800 new cases of cancer and 76,200 deaths from cancer will occur in Canada in 2010. This is 2,800 more new cases and 900 more deaths than in 2009. Prostate, lung, breast and colorectal cancer account for the top four newly diagnosed cancers.

In 2010, an estimated 2,020 people will die of cancer in New Brunswick, and 4,600 new cases will be diagnosed.

Cancer statistics for men in New Brunswick

For men in New Brunswick, prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer. In 2010:

  • An estimated 690 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer.
  • An estimated 310 men will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer.
  • An estimated 420 men will be diagnosed with lung cancer.

For men in New Brunswick, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. In 2010:

  • An estimated 370 men will die of lung cancer.
  • An estimated 120 men will die of colorectal cancer.
  • An estimated 140 men will die of prostate cancer.

Cancer statistics for women in New Brunswick

For women in New Brunswick , breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer. In 2010:

  • An estimated 560 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer.
  • An estimated 310 women will be diagnosed with lung cancer.
  • An estimated 240 women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

For women in New Brunswick , lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. In 2010:

  • An estimated 220 women will die of lung cancer.
  • An estimated 130 women will die of breast cancer.
  • An estimated 100 women will die of colorectal cancer.

The above figures are taken from Canadian Cancer Statistics 2010. These statistics are prepared, printed, and distributed through a collaboration of the Canadian Cancer Society, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Statistics Canada, provincial/territorial cancer registries, as well as university-based and provincial/territorial cancer agency-based cancer researchers.

Canadian Cancer Statistics 2010

Last modified on: 25 May 2010

2010 Newfoundland-Labrador Cancer Statistics

All statistics below are estimates projected by the Canadian Cancer Society/Statistics Canada/Provincial/Territorial Cancer Registries and the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Rates for other provinces can be found in the Canadian Cancer Statistics, 2010.

Overall,

  • A total of 2,700 new cases of cancer will occur in Newfoundland and Labrador this year.
  • In Newfoundland and Labrador 1,550 men and 1,200 women will be diagnosed with cancer this year.
  • In Newfoundland and Labrador a total of 810 men and 610 women will die from cancer this year.

Lung cancer,

  • A total of 180 men and 160 women will be diagnosed
  • 240 men and 170 women will die.

Colorectal cancer,

  • A total of 300 men and 210 women will be diagnosed
  • 140 men and 110 women will die.

Prostate cancer,

  • A total of 510 men will be diagnosed
  • 85 men will die.

Breast cancer,

  • A total of 370 women will be diagnosed
  • 110 women will die.

Pancreas cancer,

  • A total of 25 men and 10 women will be diagnosed
  • 30 men and 30 women will die.

Melanoma (Skin cancer),

  • A total 50 men and 45 women will be diagnosed
  • 10 men and 10 women will die.

Kidney cancer,

  • A total of 50 men and 30 women will be diagnosed
  • 20 men and 15 women will die.

Stomach cancer,

  • A total of 50 men and 25 women will be diagnosed
  • 35 men and 25 women will die.

Bladder cancer,

  • A total of 85 men and 30 women will be diagnosed
  • 25 men and 10 women will die.

Esophagus cancer,

  • A total of 20 men will be diagnosed (A number was not given for women)
  • 20 men will die (A number was not given for women).

Leukemia cancer,

  • A total of 20 men and 10 women will be diagnosed
  • 20 men and 10 women will die.

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma,

  • A total of 50 men and 50 women will be diagnosed
  • 20 men and 15 women will die.

Cervical cancer,

  • A total of 20 women will be diagnosed
  • 15 women will die.

Ovarian cancer,

  • A total of 25 women will be diagnosed
  • 30 women will die.

Brain cancer,

  • A total of 30 men and 15 women will be diagnosed
  • 20 men and 15 women will die

Source: Canadian Cancer Statistics, 2010

Last modified on: 20 May 2010

Canadian Strategy on Palliative and End-of-Life Care: Final Report

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Table of Contents

Accomplishments

Funded by, and in collaboration with Health Canada, each of the five community based working groups was instrumental in the achievements outlined in the following section. The timeline on the left side of this page outlines some of these key achievements, while the text provides more detail on the full range of activities.

This strategy is far to lengthily to copy into this document. It is available on the web at this link: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hcs-sss/pubs/palliat/2007-soin_fin-end_life/accom-reuss-eng.php




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Blueknowser

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Grad. Saint Mary's University, 1975, got into the medical device business initially in sales, then various management positions up to president, all in Medical Devices. I prefer therapy products over diagnostic, but they are all fun, and in a way have defined my life. I have now evolved, with help from my 35 year partner Lynnda with whom I now share every hour. I am into staying healthy, photography, kayaking, bicycling, gardening and two books a week. I wish I had gotten to this stage earlier!